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lots of books written about civil rights, but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day by day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from the kennedy's assassination to the passage of the voting rights act when numerous of our most distinguished historians say more legislation of huge impact on our society took place in that brief period than any other period in american history. you can stack it up along roosevelt's first 100 days. teddy roosevelt's good times. wilson's, andrew jackson. none of them excel what got accomplished in that brief period of time. i think there's a joy and pleasure in reading about it, but i think we still have things to learn. anyway i thought if -- that i took -- if i took king and johnson together and used them, their relationship, their agreements, their disagreements i would have a slightly new prism to be able to look at why all this stuff happened in that period of time. there were many, many, many factors. when i talk with people some will say, well, it was because
i was honored to be among three civil rights leaders that i was invited with the head of the naacp and urban league, labor leaders from three organizations, showing that it is not a struggle that has yet won. we must continue to fight. it took the dr. kings, the rosa parks, to make it possible for us to have an open america. it took those that fought for gender equality and gay and l z lesbian rights and labor rights to open up america, it takes those of us now to continue to fight. we have gone through a turbulent time, we've gone through turbulent history. but we've not arrived yet. when you fly, you don't get off the plane when you get out of turbulence, you get off once you've reached your destination. until we get to the destination of this country, this nation living up to its creed, it will not be time for us to dislodge those that do what is necessary to keep this nation moving forward, both in office and those that are out of office and in the streets of this nation raising issues. that's what king day is about. that's what the victory of b arksz barack obama is a victory
for gay people, which he, uniquely, could make part of the civil rights movement or economic fairness, it all came back into we the people. i think it's the best inaugural address. i agree, most second inaugurals are terrible. i would accept franklin roosevelt and in some sense, the president was echoing that when he talked about the shrinking few who do very well and the growing many who barely get by. but what is amazing is it was a bookend. and i think rick's right about this. it was a bookend to the reagan speech in 1980. it made progressive vision for america mainstream. it claimed the mainstream of america for progressive values. i think it's a very significant speech. >> well, rick, respond to that. i think it develops the point. listen to what the president said about the middle class. take a look here, rick. >> we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well when a growing many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. >> well, the president gave a strong defen
. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two americans are either in or near poverty, the younger you are, the more likely you are to be in poverty, these are things that king gave his life for in the end. why is there so little traction on this issue? >> i think that the civil rights reforms were actually the easier part of his dream. it did not cost anything. there was no appropriation associated with the passage of the civil rights act of 1964 or the voting rights act of 1965. there was not a major investment required. to deal with the issue of poverty, you have to be thinking about a major investment in our declining public education system. you have to be thinking about the h
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
kron 4 news. today, americans across the bay and the nation honoring civil rights leader, dr. martin luther king junior. he played a significant role in advancing african - american and human rights through non-violence and civil disobedience in the 19- sixties. until his assasination in 1968. here in the bay area -- thousands of people gathered at the yerba buena gardens in san francisco for the annual m-l-k -day- celbration. here are some of the sights and sounds from the holiday event. this was the scene at diridon station early this morning in san jose. hundreds of people honoring dr. king -- by boarding the freedom train. an annual tradition. the dr. martin luther king jr association. charters and pays for the trains. they have been doing so for the past 30 years. actually, two trains were needed to accommodate this year's crowds. many people hearr mission on this day. is to keep dr king's dream alive. hundreds more freedom riders climbed aboard in palo alto for the trip to san francisco. where they were to join the march and rally in honor of the late civil rights leader. and d
of american rights and civil rights. >> that was really something. to hear him mention stonewall in the first statements, certainly for gay and lesbian americans, that was a stunning leap forward. >> gigantic. he connected it all to the patriots of 1776. that we keep widening in our democracy. he made those places almost like battlefield spots. like oxford, mississippi or normandy or iwo jima. it's an iconic speech. >> i was going to say time and again when presidents have come here, when they've cited heroes, they've been military heroes. to talk about seneca falls and selma is more about an inclusive america with an emphasis on the equality of opportunity. not upon liberty. a republican would have traditionally given a speech about liberty. >> stonewall was the group of people most marginalized in society and the most shunned who weren't even allowed to congregate in a bar at the same time without getting harassed and arrested. >> stonewall from 1969 has been considered almost alternate left history for a while. now gay studies has come into the fold. here the president of the united states
's right, shep. you heard the president citing both of them, talking a lot about civil rights and really casting himself as someone who wants to carry on their civil rights legacies. i think the broadered message of that what it means in the current political environment is he made very clear that he just didn't win the last election. he believes he has a mandate. he believes he is going to be very aggressive in the days ahead. he was talking about taking action on climate change, immigration reform and at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits. he also gave a very rigorous defense of entitlement spending, take a listen. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. [ applause ] they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. [ applause ] >> now, interesting as well that the white house put out a tweet about another part of the speech where he said, quote: our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and
honoring civil rights leader, drf. martin luther king junior. he played a significant role in advancing african - american and human rights through non- violence and civil disobedience in the 19- sixties. until his assasination in 1968. for thousands of people here in the bay area, the tribute to doctor king began with a train ride today.. kron four's rob fladeboe was among those aboard the annual freedom train for >> reporter: long live the dream. and long were the lines here at diridon station in san jose for caltrains annual holiday tribute to the late civil rights leader. hundreds of people packed a pair of trains from san jose to san francisco on a bright clear morning with not one but two occasions to celebrate. for some, riding the freedom train has become an annual tradition. others rode for the first time. an on-going history lesson. >> we listened to his speech. it was pretty amazing and i feel very inspired. >> i do not know about anybody else but i think it was great. >> reporter: the freedom train picked up momentum and more passengers in palo alto as it rolled on north tow
the alabama civil civil rights march. >> this is for all americans. to get out and enjoy this day and to celebrate and remember the struggles that we all have been through. [ singing ] >> reporter: hundreds of people join said them for a mile and a half march to the gardens. >> celebrating dr. king and celebrating community. that is important. >> reporter: more than a thousand people attended prayer services services and presentations on the life of dr. king. she knew and marched with dr. king. >> very, very nice. he was a wonderful person. wonderful person. non-violent. turning of the cheek. >> reporter: she was one of many african americans turned away that voting both. joining a dangerous protest march. she marched with dr. king on the civil rights march. >> very, very scary and a memorable experience that just doesn't go away. >> reporter: many people said a lot changed but more needs to change. reporting live in san francisco, rob roth, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> 49er head coach jim harbaugh had a lot to say today, we will let you hear what he is not looking forward to when he
are honoring the civil rights leader played a significant role in advancing american rights, human rights for nonviolence in civil disobedience. until his assassination in 1968. thousands of people, the tributes started with a train ride. this was the annual fee o freedom train. he played a significant roleamerican rights through non-violence, and civil disobedience in the 19- sixties. until his for thousands of people here in the bay area, the tribute to doctor king began with a train ride today.. kron four's rob fladeboe was among those aboard the annual 'freedom train.' >> long live the dream. and long were the lines here at diridon station in san jose for caltrains annual holiday hundreds of people packed a pair of trains from san jose to san francisco on a bright clear morning with not one but two occasions to celebrate. for some, riding the freedom train has become an annual tradition. others rode for the first time. an on-going >> we listened to his speech of viagra tree might think it is pretty amazing. it is history. >> i do not know about everyone else but i did not realize ther
it not change with things like civil rights things like gay rights. what is it about this issue? >> reporter: well, one of the hard things since it's legalized, most people especially younger women have come to expect this is their right, they have the right to this care. we're not out there demanding something new but we're encouraging to keep the right we already have. so it's not quite the same for a struggle in guy rights or something new. for this generation it's maintain what we already have so you're not going to see as much enthusiasm. now people are seeing what can happen if you take for grants the right to have access to an abortion care and people are starting to push back. i'm optimistic about how we feel about this going forward. >> michael: that's a great answer to the question. that's exactly right. it's keeping it right rather than trying to get a new right. that makes a difference. it's also a big difference to keep news coverage of this alive all the time. thank you kate sheppard from mother jones magazine for coming on "the war room"." we have a progressive from a red stat
like yeager for being passionate because guns are the civil rights victims of our time. it's no coincidence that most of them are black. [ laughter ] and that i get nasty looks when i sit down with one at a lunch counter. [ laughter ] and i'm not the only one who thinks so. standing with me is larry ward founder of the first-ever gun appreciation day, which happens to be this saturday, the same weekend as martin luther king day. and that's no coincidence. >> i believe that gun appreciation day honors the legacy of dr. king. i think martin luther king would agree with me if he were alive today. >> stephen: yes, dr. king would be pro-gun just as surely as jesus would be pro-nail. [ laughter ] because like mr. ward, dr. king understood that the root of all oppression is lack of firepower. [ laughter ] >> if african-americans had been given the right to keep and bear arms from day one of the country's founding, perhaps slavery might not have been a chapter in our history. [ laughter ] >> stephen: yes! if only america's founders had turned to the people they owned and chained in
provides. we're a civil rights office and civil right laws are not affirmative action laws and they don't say you have to do more for people with disabilities. you have to provide accommodations, particularly if requested, but because we have members who sometimes have participated on the bridge line, we have allowed that. i will get into a little bit of weeds here, we're a passive meeting body. we're not a policy-making body. the city attorney of the berkeley and state- the city of berkeley fought having a bridge line for their disability council and were successful with the state. they said that having a bridge line for council members to vote is a violation of the brown act and that to have a bridge line you have to declare the individual council member's home a meeting place. that anybody from the public could go there as well, which was goofy, but that is the law. but in any case, we have that. other public bodies don't and they don't have to. >> so
? >> a heart as big as the world. >> john bellcastor was barack obama's law partner doing civil rights work in chicago from 1993 to 2003. >> in our law firm he never raised his voice. the no drama obama you hear about today was that way back in 1993. >> and dotting the crowd the young celebrities drawn to obama. katie berry and john mayer and jeffrey wright who spoke of the hope of the day. >> it's about the hope of the country and the example we set to the world in terms of free and working democracy. and it's about partnership and it's about what you know, the common ground between all of us as americans. and so, you know, if this doesn't illustrate that then we have a lot of hard work to do. >> and the musical artists mostly represented the young 21st century artists like kelly clarkson. ♪ >> and an obama favorite and friend, beyonce. ♪ for the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming >> we the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal. it is the star that guides us still. just as it guided our forebearers through seneca falls
that quarterback's arms. >>> a bay area civil rights activist went to the president's second inauguration, why his wife says it was important to be there, even if he may not be able to remember it. how big a 49ers fan jwwñ >>> enjoy one last day of hazy sunshine, and a few high clouds. we've got storm clouds gathering off the coastline. we'll talk about prospects for rain coming up. >>> enjoy light traffic conditions, looking good across the golden gate. the bay bridge and san mateo bridge all problem free. more timesaver traffic coming up. >>> a lot of you have been sending us your photos showing us how big a 49'ers fan you are, check out these. these guns, by the way. kaepernicking. he's been a 49'ers fan since the 1980s. we will be showing more fan photos later in the newscast. keep them coming to news@kpix.com. we've been getting good ones. >> tattoos will get popular too. >> even more so, yes. >> thanks to mr. kaepernick again. >>> 4:54. the bay area paid tribute to dr. m.l.k., in oakland installing plants, and on the other side of the bay hundre
to a second term on a holiday celebrating one of its foremost civil rights leaders. >> while these truths may be self-evident, they have never been self-executing. >> reporter: it was as much an inauguration as a cross cultural celebration. a place where a puerto rican woman raised in a housing project swears in a catholic environment from scranton, pennsylvania, where a gay cuban immigrant reads his home about a rising sun shining equally on all of us. >> my face, your face. millions of faces in morning's mirrors. >> president obama tied it all together in his speech, linking his vision to the evolving history of civil rights in the u.s. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still, just as it guided our forbearers to seneca falls and selma and stonewall. just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsong, who left footprints along this great mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. >> reporter: he swore on the bibles of abraham lincoln and dr. martin luther king jr., connecticuting
stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of the civil right era who made this possible. even early on, many of the civil rights leaders early on in the primary process were with hillary clinton and it took a while for them to trust him and know who he was. and he used a lot of that conversation saying, look, because of you all, i am possible. and i remember we saw congressman lewis there, he was one of the people who had sort of that great turmoil because he was originally for hillary, then he said his consciousness, he changed for barack obama. i think the president gets it, he understands it, and he's very respectful of it. >> i also think about, he spoke about the fierce urgency of now early on. for many in the gay community in the united states, they didn't feel that he had that sense of fierce urgency. i think today after the speech, i think there are a lot of gay and lesbian americans who were surprised to hear a president use the word stonewall and use it in the same sentence as selma and seneca falls and would certainly argue that he now has a sense of fierce urgency
. and they paused before this bust of the civil rights leader. the president said this was the first time he'd noticed the king bust among artifacts there and said it was a privilege to use the bible of the civil rights leader in his swearing in ceremony. >> the 24th annual martin luther king junior paradex÷(f held this morning this, is the oldest tribute to king in the east bay. the parade ended with a rally. >> people in san jose honored the late civil rights leader by hopping aboard the annual freedom train. this train ended in san francisco, coming up at 4:55 we'll have a report on other events around san francisco honoring dr. king. >> check out this video shot hours ago by sky 7 hd. that is a surfer near the cliff house. >> strong rip currents caused the surfer to lose his bearings. the coast guard first thought of air lifting him but then decided on a different approach. they told the surfer to jump into the water and jim against crashing waves to rescuers. >> shouldn't have been as far as i was with my buddy. he was a more advanced surfer. called whoever needed to call, and they ca
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
, gay rights, civil rights. there was a feeling in the way he framed on that platform it felt different to her. it felt different to me. that was your reaction as well? >> it felt different to me as well. we're all sitting around whether we're journalists or not. we're listening for things. from our own experiences. so when i heard the president of the united states say stonewall after saying seneca falls and selma, sort of an electric shock went through me. whoa, the president of the united states just woef in the gay rights movement with the women's rights movement and the traditional civil rights movement, but he didn't just leave it there. that would have been box checking, but in the next paragraph he talked about our gay brothers and sisters and equal treatment under the law, and that went well beyond what i think anyone even expected a president of the united states to say in an inaugural address one of their premier platforms for the american president to not only talk to the american people, but to tack to the world. while this was a domestic address, a completely agree with th
address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan altar and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they're gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritr
makes history in his second inaugural address and chronicles america's struggles for civil rights. i'll talk about the cultural impact of today's speech with jonathan alter and james peterson. stay tuned. you're watching the "ed show" on msnbc from washington. [ female announcer ] going to sleep may be easy, but when you wake up in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reaction to drugs containing zolpidem, such as ambien. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath or swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and may be fatal. intermezzo should not be taken if you have taken another sleep medicine at bedtime or in the middle of the night or drank alcohol that day. do not drive or operate mac
and civil rights. in fact civil rights for gays was a centerpiece of the president wants speech today. he said more about it than any president in a presidential address. while is he preoccupied with social justice that's in part because these other issues that you spoke about, invog gore rating the economy which has had such anemic recovery and dealing with the burgeoning deficits and exploding national debt are issues that don't particularly interest him. i'm not sure that the economy ever has. you may recall when he first took office he got through congress this stimulus package which was kind of a grab bag of spending of all kinds favored by members of his party in congress and then he basically abandoned the issue to take on something that i think appealed to him much more, that being the reform of the healthcare system. known as obama care which was adding another entitlement. >> >> bill: let me stop you there you would agree with me that president obama is a i have intelligent man, correct? >> he yes, very much so. he has to know the track is he on is going to cause irreparable har
the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal then surely the love we dmoyt one another must be equal as well. >>reporter: president insisting we address climate change and immigration arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled from our country there. were powerful performances. kelly clarkson stirring rendition of my country 'tis of thee. ♪ [ singing]. >>reporter: beyonce returning 4 years later this time to sing the national anthem. ♪ the rockets♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof ♪ through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ . >>reporter: as the president made his exit up those steps, a pause. turning around to take in his final inaugural moment one more time. microphone picking up what he said. >> about first couple made their way back to the white house, they emerge from the motorcade as they did 4 years ago. crowds cheering return home. first family taking in a parade. first couple with the kiss. the president moving to the
chartered ride honors martin ruther king jr.'s birthday and his fight for civil rights >> martin king was for civil rights, equal opportunity and peace. >> we have come a long way, but we still have a long way to go. >> cofounder says this is the longest running freedom train in the united states. on its 29th year. >> it is good to have people realize that there are so many other people that also have the concern about having a more racially just society. >> a lianoid san jose's diridon started early. >> had it not been for him making all the steps he made and doing all the things he did, i don't feel like this would be possible. we wouldn't have the freedom we have now. >> speakers on the train tin collude teresa cox and u.s. marshals talked about the impact oned to's world. the route goes for 54 miles, the same distance king and a group of activist marched to the steps of the capital of montgomery campaigning for voting rights. today, the nation's first black president was sworn in for a second term. >> a double sell brought martin luther king h
martin luther king jr. stood for civil rights, non-violence organized labor social justice and ending war. today america usually remembers one out of five. i'll start with you tom why is that? >> we all take from dr. king and larger than life figures what we choose to, and sometimes there is an interest involved like avoiding his strong criticism of the vietnam war in 1967, which was very unpopular at the time with some of the black ministers, with the "new york times," with organized labor with much of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civi
term starts with passing medicare, voting rights act, civil rights act just on the triumph of getting social welfare legislation through and here comes vietnam in 1965 overshadowing it all and everything turns and as you're listening to the tapes of these conversations and you hear the despair in his -- the growing despair in his voice as vietnam comes to overshadow everything he wanted to do and that he wanted to started to do in the second term. you see how a second term can go really bad. >> rose: what did he say "that bitch of a war stole --" >> the woman i love, the great society. >> rose: the challenge for a second term? >> well, the challenge i think often times is that a president who's had great reelections suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob
several pivotal civil rights moments, he linked them together. dan yoth lothian has the highlights. >> reporter: this is a speech we're told the president had been working on since mid december, and he delivered it rather in a much different climate than he had four years ago, and he was dealing with two wars and also a financial crisis this time, the president used history to help define a progressive agenda for the next four years. >> please raise your right hand. >> reporter: and so it began. the second inaugural ceremony of president barack obama. part campaign speech, part pragmatic lecture, a confident mr. obama appeared comfortable in his presidential skin. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and he will shall seize it together. >> reporter: the speech was rooted in history and fittingly on this holiday, reverend martin luther king jr.'s dream. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are created equal. >> the past made modern with first-time references to climate change, immigration reform and sexual equality. >> our journey is not complete u
very much. >> now bernice king the daughter of civil rights leader martin luther king jr. and coretta scott king discusses the recently published biography of her mother. desert rose the life and legacy of coretta scott king. she talked with booktv at bookexpo america publishing's annual trade show. this is about half an hour. >> bernice king who is edith scott dagley? >> guest: at edith scott bickley -- coretta scott king was the wife of martin luther king jr. -- cohost land your mother. >> guest: yes my mother so she was my aunt. she and my mother grew up in alabama together and she later became a drama professor. in fact she founded the drama department at the state university. she was a very lively woman and unfortunately passed last year in june. after completing this book. >> this book is desert rose the life and legacy of coretta scott king and the author is your aunt eva scott dagley? when did she write this book lacks. >> guest: well it was a journey that began with my mother's requested 1966 to write her story. at that time both of my parents were constantly being threaten
and vice president paid tribute to dr. king a second time, pausing at a bust of the slain civil rights leader in the rotunda. during the procession down pennsylvania avenue, the president and first lady walked part of the way and later took their place in the reviewing stand as the inaugural parade began. ♪ >> reporter: and the party continued into the night. ♪ he's president and he's on fire ♪ >> reporter: michelle obama wowed the audiences at two inaugural balls in a ruby chiffon and velvet gown by jason wu. but the celebration was not as grand as 2009 which saw the president and first lady attend ten balls. >> now that the parties are over the work on president obama's second term begins. susan mcginnis with more on that. good morning. >> reporter: anne-marie, good morning. yes, item number one is the debt limit. we learned on monday that the house will vote tomorrow on raising the debt ceiling for a period of three months, and the republicans have made a big concession. they had their dance and took a moment to savor the scene. now it's time to get ba
freedom. >> cenk: he connected it to the civil rights and women's rights m. that was a moment today and one you should soak in. there were moments that i thought were--let's just put it this way ironic. >> obama: this generation of americans has been tested by crises that test our resolve and prove our resilience. the decade of war is just ending. >> cenk: only if it were so. there was recently a statement put out that basically the war on terror will continue indefinitely at least for another ten years but probably much longer than that, and by the way we had another drone strike in yemen today as president obama was saying that the war is coming to an end interesting. and then here is the issue of politics and the central theme of the campaign. remember how paul ryan and mitt romney talked about the takers? well the president addressed that. >> obama: we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives any one of us at any time may face a job loss or a sudden illness or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medi
on civil rights, but we can be right -- we can be first on human rights. instead of being laughed, we want to be first at something, and we believe being first ending abortion is a good thing. >> 3 hours drive from jackson, you have reached the mississippi delta. in one of the poorest parts of america, choosing to have an abortion is not an option for many women. they cannot afford to pay for the procedure. >> she is 13 years old. last month, she gave birth to her daughter. >> it is hard to go to school. i'm very sleepy. >> [indiscernible] >> gin at ground level has been working with pregnant teenagers in the delta and for 17 years. she is worried that the jackson clinic closes, more of these weylandt will have an unwanted pregnancies. -- more of these women will have unwanted pregnancies. >> [indiscernible] >> hsu became a mother two years ago when she had her daughter. now out of work, she is struggling with her decision not to become a mother again. >> i know this is something i have to do. i have to do this for me. >> bbc news, mississippi. >> the restriction of abortion rights 40 year
the grounder work and test the stage. then we can be last on civil rights but first on human rights. we believe being -- >> emma anderson chose do become a mother two years ago when she had her daughter. now out of work, she is struggling with her decision not to become a mother again. >> i'm really undecided about how i feel on it. but i know it's something i have to do. i have to do what's best for me at this point. >> "bbc world news", mississippi. >> a lot to think about this. plenty more on our top story, the election in israel. but stay with us here on "bbc world news." >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. decisions. we offer expertise and tailored
don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i t
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